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August Newsletter of Personal Essay Writing
Vol. 14, No. 8 August 2014 © 2014 Carol Celeste All Rights Reserved ISSN 2168-7854

Well Art

CONTENTS
* Carol's Comments
* Memoir Quote
* Article - "From Journal to Essay"
* Course Offerings
* Personal Essay Topic to Write About NOW
* Become a Licensee
* Therapeutic Writing Fact
* Book Review
* Markets
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CAROL'S COMMENTS
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When I was a child, summer vacation ran from mid-June to mid-September. These days, with some schools in session year round and others adopting helter-skelter schedules, summer seems over before it really begins. Back-to-school ads already accost us, a reminder, even if we don't have students to send back to school, that the summer lull will soon end. Groups that went dark will soon resume meeting, filling our calendar blocks with commitments.

Does your calendar have a place for writing? Life-writing brings a dual challenge. Making time to write our life stories requires activities that give us something to write about. But time spent living life decreases the time available to write about it. We need to allot time for both the living and the writing of our personal experiences to accomplish our writing goals. Whether you write to leave a legacy, for public acclaim or solely for your own well-being, deadlines and guidance help you get the most from the time you spend putting your life, your thoughts and your feelings into words. There is still time left this summer to take a six week personal essay class as warm up for your fall writing schedule.

The article in this issue may inspire you to work on a journal, whether you do or don't take a class. All writing is good for your health and journals boost your life-writing repertoire. The book review deals with a good example of memoir to inspire you in your own writing. I hope you learn from both.

Look for paying markets for your work by clicking on on the Paying Markets menu tab.

Write to heal, write to grow, write to reflect,
Carol Celeste
carol@writingtoheal.com
www.writingtoheal.com
www.twitter.com/writingtoheal
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Memoir Quote: "I believe that the memoir is the novel for the 21st century; it's an amazing form that we haven't even begun to tap.." Susan Cheever, memoir and biography author
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COURSE OFFERINGS ~
All courses are conducted by email and begin every Friday. Compare the prices to other online personal essay courses and you'll realize the value offered. Meidabistro=$499, Gotham Writers Workshop=$395, Writers.com=$295 and up, Truby's=$449 to name a few. Don't wait another day. To register now or order a course as a gift visit Writing Courses.
These courses are now offered:
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WRITING PERSONAL ESSAYS Personal Essays
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WRITING PERSONAL ESSAYS--ADVANCED WPE Advanced.
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YOUR LIFE IN ESSAYS Your Life.
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WRITING TO SELL Writing to Sell.
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WTH,WTG writers say...

"I learned how to improve my opening and ending paragraphs, and the importance of bringing them together." Learn how with a WPE course.

"You made what I had written read much better without adding anything new."

"I liked the fact that the essay topics were flexible, allowing me to tweak the subject."

"I enjoyed your lectures and read them over and over underlining pertinent points that I wanted to remember as I drafted my essays."
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ARTICLE - From Journal to Essay
In a recent issue of The Writer magazine, author and reporter Jack Hamann told how transcribing his old journals enhanced his other writing. The process, he says, revealed"a treasure buried by me, discovered by a map I had never bothered to decipher."

Writing is a good memory jog and so is transcribing. Lists may not seem like "writing,” but they remind us of the things we include and by referencing them repeatedly memory takes over, making the list less necessary. In the same way, transcribing our journal jottings reminds us of forgotten events and serves as a catalyst for other memories. Since journals deal with personal experience, feelings and attitudes, they make an ideal source for personal essay topics.

Before you can benefit from transcribing entries, you have to write them. Here are some ways in which transcribing journals, both recent entries and those from decades ago, can enrich the writing you do today.

Memory Recall Our minds archive memories leaving room in our consciousness for things of immediate use.   Reviewing records of times past brings them out of the attic for potential use in a current work.
Essay Ideas In the act of transcribing we may stumble on a forgotten life event that yields a topic for an essay or   other work, or that will enhance a work in progress.
Usable phrases Our jottings may hold word or concept treasures worthy of use in our public work.
Revealing Details We don't remember everything about an incident, even a major one, but what we wrote about it as   it happened can provide details that give writing texture and bring readers into the scene.
Concentration Transcribing requires focus on the words before us, helping us retain the information we copy,   making it more available for future use.
Self-knowledge Focus on life experiences and reactions leads to personal improvement and becoming more likeable,   to others and to ourselves.

All of our writing, personal and general, benefits from self-discovery. What buried treasures of yours await transcribing?
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PERSONAL ESSAY TOPIC
Looking for something to write about? Here's a topic to inspire your inner self to emerge.

Write about an event that changed your spiritual attitude, either making it stronger or weaker.
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BECOME A LICENSEE!
Looking for extra income while you help people? Writing to Heal, Writing to Grow licenses let you set your own hours as a workshop facilitator. All instructions provided. Individuals, facilities and associations may lead these easy-to-conduct therapeutic writing workshops.

Individuals, facilities and associations may license and conduct these easy-to-lead therapeutic writing and discussion programs:
* Writing for Wellness - Why wait until a specific condition strikes to write to heal? Writing helps maintain good health. This four-week expressive writing and discussion course is designed to help adults maintain good health by: reducing stress levels, improving immune system function, working through negative emotional issues, and increasing working memory. Clinical studies indicate that those who are coached in expressive writing show the greatest improvement in stress levels and memory function. Learn more at: Wellness.
* Writing About Cancer - promotes healing and growth for patients and survivors. Visit Cancer to learn more.
* Writing for Personal Caregivers - contributes to stress reduction and coping. Visit Caregivers to learn more.
* Writing for Health Care Professionals - may be eligible for CEUs in your area. Visit Care Professionals to learn more.

You do not need to have special education to be a successful facilitator. What you do need is compassion for people, a desire to help others face their demons and heal, and the ability to talk to others in a group setting and market the workshops. All courses promote personal healing and/or growth. Each license comes with lecture material, a step-by-step facilitator guide, handouts and an evaluation survey. Begin your new career helping others. Email Licensing for details.
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Therapeutic Writing Fact
From: "Workplace Health Promotion" white paper by Ron Goetzel, PhD et. al. "Aside from reducing health risks...the task force noted that there may be additional benefits associated with workplace programs, including...increasing worker awareness of health issues." [Ed. note: Expressive writing is an easy and cost effective program for employers to provide.]
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Book Review ~ The World's Strongest Librarian by Josh Hanagarne
The subtitle of this book, A Memoir of Tourette's, Faith, Strength, and the Power of Family, sums up the content and shows the scope of sub-themes covered by Josh Hanagarne in this memoir. Most of us won't ever know anyone with Tourette's Syndrome and you may not even know the symptoms of this neurological disorder. Hanagarne explains Tourette's Syndrome, which he nicknamed Misty, as"every cell in my body has a parasitic shade clinging to it." That shade manifested in uncontrollable and unannounced shouts and jerky movements. In this book, the author shares his feelings during the aspects of his life noted in the subtitle.

Symptoms first appeared in early childhood and baffled his parents, doctors and the author. As he grew older school children mocked his jerky motions and bullied him. The family and faith aspects of the story merge in his treatment.

He grew up in a Mormon household, his mother's faith of birth, his fathe's adopted faith for purposes of marriage. Both parents labored to find the cause of Josh's strange behavior and at one point his father believed it was Tourette's. It took his mother some time to accept that diagnosis. Later in life Hanagarne married a Mormon girl and the entire extended family supported his efforts to get through life while unable to stick with a career or formal education. He tried but just couldn't stay with any program long enough to complete it. Reading became his pastime of choice.

Hanagarne relates his trials with love, his Mormon mission, which he had to leave early, and his faith with honesty and relates the bafflement he felt as he tried to lead a normal life.

He eventually finds help through strength training, manages to complete his education and find work in a library, a favorite spot to engage his love of reading. He found a kind soul who set him up with a training program and led him to competitive weight lifting. This was the most successful of treatments among the many he tried. Perhaps the most extreme was an injection that paralyzed his vocal cords for over a year. He couldn't make the disruptive noises (or any other sounds) during that time, but his body still tried, so the haphazard movements continued and Misty remained his constant companion.

The straightforward language, humor and genuiness of the memoir earn Hanagarne his readers' empathy and make us cheer for his final success in dealing with Misty and becoming productive. The World's Strongest Librarian is a fine example of a memoir that follows accepted technique and honest sharing.
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MARKETS FOR PERSONAL ESSAYS
Contact the source listed for details and to request guidelines. An extensive list of paying markets for personal essays appears at Markets. Writing to Heal,Writing to Grow does not screen or endorse these listings. Submit at your own risk and always check guidelines first. Good luck! If a link doesn't work cut and paste the URL into your browser or search for the title.
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Payton James Freeman Essay Contest sponsored by Drake University in Iowa and others, invites essays up to 3,500 words on the theme "After the Unhappy Ending." Winner receives $500, publication in The Rumpus and a trip to the university to speak and read from the winning work. No Fee. Deadline Sept. 30. Learn more at: Payton James Freeman Essay Contest.
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Heartfelt Stories by Moms and Thanks to My Mom by Chicken Soup have a Sept. 30 deadline for 1,200 words. The first is open to any aspect of mothering or grandmothering, painful or joyful. The second may come from children of any age about moms or stepmoms. Pay $200. Find more details at: Chicken Soup.

Creative Nonfiction Waiting Contest takes true essays up to 4,000 words on the topic of “waiting” that deal with your relationship with time. Prizes: $1,000 and $500. All submissions considered for publication. Fee: $20, deadline Sept. 22. Learn more at: Creative Nonfiction.

Skirt!® magazine takes personal essays between 800 and 1,100 words about women and their interests. Deadline falls the 1st of the month preceding the issue month (i.e., Nov. 1 for Dec. issue). Pay varies. Publishes several essays each month.Find monthly themes and tips to improve acceptance at: Skirt!®.

Share personal essay markets you know about. Email them to carol@writingtoheal.com and I'll add them to the website list.
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